Parable of the Prodigal Son

Started by Rev. Edward Engelbrecht, March 26, 2022, 11:33:05 AM

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pastorg1@aol.com

#30
Laetare Sunday here, too. Rose chausable. Scrutiny took place as well with the catechumen brought forward, prayed for, blessed, exorcised and readied for baptism at Easter Vigil. I, a candidate for full communion, simply stood up in the pew and received prayers.

Sermon was on Augustine vs. Pelagius and that our good works do not justify us before God. God is all grace and our relationship with Him is by, with and through His grace.

The sermon noted how the works of the elder son only produces jealousy but that the father reconciles both sons to his love and riches.

Peter (I suspect the priest was told of a Lutheran boar in his vineyard- pace Pope Leo X) Garrison
Pete Garrison
RC Catechist

Donald_Kirchner

#31
Quote from: Dave Benke on March 27, 2022, 01:54:24 PM
Rest easy, elder son - you'll get it all

He was offered it all and rejected it.

Rest easy, younger son. You'll get it all.
Don Kirchner

"Heaven's OK, but it's not the end of the world." Jeff Gibbs

peter_speckhard

I'm not sure I agree with the idea that "all that is mine is yours" applies to the older brother because the younger brother has spent his portion. I think it is a comment on the nature of being a son as opposed to a servant. My children refer to my house as their house because it is their house by virtue of the fact that they are my children.

Dan Fienen

The parable is not really about inheritance laws and customs. In parables, not every detail has significance, some are just to keep the story going. The context of the parable, given at the beginning of the chapter, is that the Scribes and Pharisees were disgruntled that Jesus was welcoming sinners and eating with them. It is apparent that they were being cast as the elder brother in the parable. As in other parables, especially I am thinking of the parable of the generous vineyard owner who pays the last workers hired the same as the first, the generosity of God is being questioned. In the parable of the generous vineyard owner, the first workers are assured that their pay was not docked to allow the last hired to be paid. Here the elder brother is assured that he will not get less because his brother is welcomed home. Exactly how the inheritance is worked out is not important to establish.
Pr. Daniel Fienen
LCMS

Donald_Kirchner

Quote from: Dan Fienen on March 27, 2022, 06:00:33 PM
The parable is not really about inheritance laws and customs. In parables, not every detail has significance, some are just to keep the story going. The context of the parable, given at the beginning of the chapter, is that the Scribes and Pharisees were disgruntled that Jesus was welcoming sinners and eating with them. It is apparent that they were being cast as the elder brother in the parable. As in other parables, especially I am thinking of the parable of the generous vineyard owner who pays the last workers hired the same as the first, the generosity of God is being questioned. In the parable of the generous vineyard owner, the first workers are assured that their pay was not docked to allow the last hired to be paid. Here the elder brother is assured that he will not get less because his brother is welcomed home. Exactly how the inheritance is worked out is not important to establish.

Exactly how salvation is worked out is key, Dan. Ultimately important.
Don Kirchner

"Heaven's OK, but it's not the end of the world." Jeff Gibbs

Dave Benke

Quote from: peter_speckhard on March 27, 2022, 04:57:08 PM
I'm not sure I agree with the idea that "all that is mine is yours" applies to the older brother because the younger brother has spent his portion. I think it is a comment on the nature of being a son as opposed to a servant. My children refer to my house as their house because it is their house by virtue of the fact that they are my children.

I'm not exactly sure either, but it's a theme worth looking into from the perspective of those times.  All the three year lectionary texts are my great friends, having preached through them now more than fifteen times.  I'm extraordinarily blessed to have been not only a bishop/supervisor for a long time with tremendous durable relationships, but to have been a parish pastor in one sanctuary for more than forty years with this amazing group from all over the world.  My wife and I are incredibly happy in this ministry, even as tough and weird as the last couple of years have been.

I'm thinking of "inheritance" over the last week and a half because we've had nine nights of funeral services in the Guyanese/West Indian custom after the tragic death of one of our members, a 29 year old young man who was struck and killed by a drunk driver on the way home from work, leaving a wife and four children aged 8, 5, 3 and 1.  Young Christopher, a Christmas baby in the early 90s, has received his eternal inheritance all too soon; those little ones are left in terms of dollars and cents with almost nothing, but in the love and care of the extended family meeting in a backyard tent night after night they received the gift of the Father who will remain and lift up and bring them all through, by grace in Christ.

Dave Benke
It's OK to Pray

Richard Johnson

Quote from: pastorg1@aol.com on March 27, 2022, 03:45:03 PM
I, a candidate for full communion, simply stood up in the pew and received prayers.

They prayed to you? Odd.  8)
The Rev. Richard O. Johnson, STS

MaddogLutheran

Quote from: Richard Johnson on March 28, 2022, 09:47:55 AM
Quote from: pastorg1@aol.com on March 27, 2022, 03:45:03 PM
I, a candidate for full communion, simply stood up in the pew and received prayers.

They prayed to you? Odd.  8)

Not at all odd...he's a saint (albeit a small 's' one).  That's what Roman Catholics do, pray to saints.  ;D 8)
Sterling Spatz
ELCA pew-sitter

Richard Johnson

Quote from: MaddogLutheran on March 28, 2022, 10:20:37 AM
Quote from: Richard Johnson on March 28, 2022, 09:47:55 AM
Quote from: pastorg1@aol.com on March 27, 2022, 03:45:03 PM
I, a candidate for full communion, simply stood up in the pew and received prayers.

They prayed to you? Odd.  8)

Not at all odd...he's a saint (albeit a small 's' one).  That's what Roman Catholics do, pray to saints.  ;D 8)

Well, there is that!  ;D ;D
The Rev. Richard O. Johnson, STS

Rev. Edward Engelbrecht

Well, here's where the sermon went. Thanks everyone who shared thoughts. Starts at minute 26:

https://youtu.be/gbM532r4Ly8

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