Bible Study, Education and More

Started by Richard Johnson, August 07, 2007, 05:06:18 PM

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Charles_Austin

Katie Abercrombie writes:
I try not to be easily offended, Charles, but could you tell me the meaning of your putting the words above in quotation marks?  One could interpret that as sarcasm...or even that you thought that you were talking down to someone who was much less intelligent or much less well informed than yourself....

I respond:
It was not sarcasm or "talking down." I'm sorry if it gave that impression.

Katie Abercrombie writes:
And to clarify my earlier statements, as a homeschooler for 15 years and as an ELCA member for even longer, I have found there to be very little support in the ELCA for homeschooling or even for education in Christian schools.

I respond:
I think you will find strong support for Christian schools in the ELCA statement on education. I do not think it is likely that large segments of the ELCA will support homeschooling.


Richard Johnson

Quote from: Charles_Austin on August 14, 2007, 01:05:10 PM
I think you will find strong support for Christian schools in the ELCA statement on education. I do not think it is likely that large segments of the ELCA will support homeschooling.

I don't think that's quite the point. The issue, and I think it has some validity, is that homeschooling is a pretty big phenomenon--perhaps not among ELCA Lutherans (though there are plenty who do), but in the culture at large. One would think that a social statement on education might address that reality, and even offer some advice and counsel. And at least in our area, there is a "connection" between public education and homeschooling in that the county Board of Education provides resources and support for parents who are homeschooling. What is puzzling is the statement's almost complete ignoring of the phenomenon. Couldn't there have been a paragraph or two somewhere?
The Rev. Richard O. Johnson, STS

Charles_Austin

Richard Johnson writes (re homeschooling):
What is puzzling is the statement's almost complete ignoring of the phenomenon. Couldn't there have been a paragraph or two somewhere?

I comment:
Well, did any of the homeschoolers take part in the discussions leading up to the social statement? Was a mention specifically rejected by those who drew up the statement? We don't know. Sure, there could have been a paragraph; but there wasn't.

Steven Tibbetts

Quote from: Richard Johnson on August 07, 2007, 05:06:18 PM
During the Bible study, they are projecting a picture of an open Bible. It isn't open to Galatians, though, but to the Lukan resurrection narrative. In the King James Version, yet. When was the last time the King James Version was featured at an ELCA Churchwide Assembly?

When the Youth Convo made its presentation, one of the readings was done by a black girl who was reading from the King James Version.  I recall that happening before at another CWA, too -- a black youth reading, not from the NRSV as everyone else does, but from the KJV. 

spt+
The Rev. Steven Paul Tibbetts, STS
Pastor Zip's Blog

Steven Tibbetts

Quote from: Richard Johnson on August 07, 2007, 05:06:18 PM
(3) The "Pier Review" also seems to be where you have to go to find out the worship leaders. The morning Eucharist, I read now, featured Bp. Claire Burkat as the preacher, and Pr. Melissa Pohlman as presiding minister. Seems odd to me that this wasn't listed in the bulletin; does it suggest that these assignments were made relatively late in the game?

This was my fourth consecutive CWA as a volunteer, and it's been that way every time.  One difference: in the past, there were always lots of extra copies of the Daily Lutheran (the old, un-cute name) available for visitors, volunteers, and others to read and take.  (Same with just about everything else printed during the Assembly -- memorials, amendments, election results, etc.)  This year, none of that.  We microphone pages could look at the copy belonging to a nearby voting member, but everyone else would just have to be mystified.  The excuse is to be "greener."  It's also much less hospitable.

pax, spt+
The Rev. Steven Paul Tibbetts, STS
Pastor Zip's Blog

aberaussie

Quote from: Matt Hummel on August 08, 2007, 08:51:19 AM


When my wife & I tried to volunteer as homeschooling parents when the task force was being assembled, we were gaffed off.  Quelle surprise! 


Here is yet another group to whom evangelical outreach could be made, but we won't. Many of the folks who homeschool doso because they do not like the ideas being promulgated in their schools.  That does not make them slack-jawed homophobe racist fundamentalists.  The support of a Sacramental church that (at least claims it) prizes education would be a good thing.  I notice from EE's post that LCMS is catching, as is CPH.  It would take too long to tell you about the rather frustrating and condescending phone call my wife had with someone from AFP asking about homeschool materials.  It boils down to this- I suppose I should be happy that AFP would rather be right (or in this case, left) than make money.



Matt+

It sounds to me like homeschoolers did try to be a part of the process.

One area where churches could be supportive of homeschoolers is to provide them a place to meet for support, co-ops, etc.  I have been somewhat involved recently with a tutorial group that was trying to find a place to meet.  One church (Baptist) turned them down because their insurance company was not friendly to the idea of having an "outside groups" meet there.  So to keep our insurance, we let an excellent facility sit empty all week?  Not good stewardship.

I'm with Richard, I don't understand why such a strong movement in our society was ignored.

Katie Abercrombie
Katie Abercrombie

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