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A Few Gaudete Reflections

Started by Weedon, December 13, 2020, 11:20:30 AM

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Weedon

I know that most folks don't use the historic lectionary, but in that lectionary today is the reason for the rose candle in the advent wreath, from the opening lines of the lntroit. Some reflections on the day:

https://weedon.blogspot.com/2020/12/gaudete.html

Jim Butler

Quote from: Weedon on December 13, 2020, 11:20:30 AM
I know that most folks don't use the historic lectionary, but in that lectionary today is the reason for the rose candle in the advent wreath, from the opening lines of the lntroit. Some reflections on the day:

https://weedon.blogspot.com/2020/12/gaudete.html

Thank you, Will.

I had never preached on the historic lectionary before last year, but decided to try it for three years (Let's call it Series D).

I was really struck by the Epistle. After telling us that the Lord brings to light the things hidden in darkness and reveals hidden purposes, Paul gives a complete non sequitur: "Thus everyone will receive his commendation from God." Condemnation would make sense; but we are commended.

Is there a greater reason to rejoice than the grace and forgiveness of God by which we are commended in His sight? Truly a day of Joy!
"Pastor Butler... [is] deaf to the cries of people like me, dismissing our concerns as Satanic scenarios, denouncing our faith and our very existence."--Charles Austin

Weedon

Jim, that VERY thought struck me as I read the Epistle last night and again this morning. Talk about joy!!!

Tom Eckstein

Quote from: Weedon on December 13, 2020, 11:20:30 AM
I know that most folks don't use the historic lectionary, but in that lectionary today is the reason for the rose candle in the advent wreath, from the opening lines of the lntroit. Some reflections on the day:

https://weedon.blogspot.com/2020/12/gaudete.html

I sometimes need to correct my elders who light the advent wreath.  They sometimes assume the pink candle is for the 4th Sunday in Advent.  But their misunderstanding allows for a teaching moment.
I'm an LCMS Pastor in Jamestown, ND.

Randy Bosch

Quote from: Weedon on December 13, 2020, 11:20:30 AM
I know that most folks don't use the historic lectionary, but in that lectionary today is the reason for the rose candle in the advent wreath, from the opening lines of the lntroit. Some reflections on the day:

https://weedon.blogspot.com/2020/12/gaudete.html 

"Good news of great joy for all people!" 
What more wonderful news can be imagined!  Thank you for sharing your reflections, bringing focus back to the great gift of Jesus Christ to us!  When all around us, even in conversations among Christians in almost any media, the world is beset by sturm und drang, sometimes only focus on Christ brings joy!
Thank you.

John_Hannah

The Three Year Cycle honors the Gaudete tradition with its selection of readings and Psalmody each year. Keep the rose candles even if you use the RCL. Gaudete is important.   :) (At least one congregation of my circuit uses rose vestments/paraments for today and for Laetare later in the year.)

Peace, JOHN
Pr. JOHN HANNAH, STS

Weedon

Tom,

Pastor Ball shared with me this very weekend the most ingenious solution to preventing the wrong candles from being lighted. He literally flips them upside down: that way there's no wick to light if they try! Only on the Sunday that candle is to be lighted does it get flipped right side up. I was mega impressed.

Randy,

You're most welcome, and thanks for the kind comments.

John,

Happy to hear it! I'm surprised we haven't got the Rose paraments yet; I'll bet its on the agenda sometime soon.

Dave Benke

I prefer Gaudete to the Spanish language word for today, which on the banner we use is "Regocijense".   Latino folks, of course, have no problem with that word, but I have to speak it as though I'm sneezing.   "Regocíjense en el Señor siempre" - Gesundheit.  Which of course works - rejoicing in the Lord always is a sign of spiritual health.

Dave Benke
It's OK to Pray

J. Thomas Shelley

Quote from: Weedon on December 13, 2020, 02:20:31 PM
Happy to hear it! I'm surprised we haven't got the Rose paraments yet; I'll bet its on the agenda sometime soon.

My former parish acquired Rose paraments following the unexpected death of our senior Deacon Emeritus and his wife within 48 hours of each other at Gaudete Sunday. 

A picture still exists on their web site although the actual use--like too many things begun during my tenure--seems to have become "memory forgotten".
Greek Orthodox Deacon - Ecumenical Patriarchate
Ordained to the Holy Diaconate Mary of Egypt Sunday A.D. 2022

Baptized, Confirmed, and Ordained United Methodist.
Served as a Lutheran Pastor October 31, 1989 - October 31, 2014.
Charter member of the first chapter of the Society of the Holy Trinity.

Weedon

#9
J. Thomas, that could almost be a meme for the Lutheran Church: the Chronicle of Memories Forgotten.

Brian Stoffregen

Quote from: Weedon on December 13, 2020, 06:14:48 PM
J. Thomas, that could almost be a meme for the Lutheran Church: the Chronicle of Memories Forgotten.


But there are also those old memories that are held tightly. Or, in other words, "This is the way we've always done it."
I flunked retirement. Serving as a part-time interim in Ferndale, WA.

Weedon

#11
Sadly, Brian, most of those are defining "we" much  too narrowly: as in my living memory. We is actually larger than that. Our Church is larger than the living memory of the folks now breathing. And the great thing about the Church, as Chesterton once observed, is that it does not disenfranchise any by accident of death, just as the true democrat disenfranchises no one by accident of birth. Truth is, the Church IS anamnesis. She holds in her memory far more than this or that individual may recall. Because she is the memory of Him who is the lot and who in His infinite mercy remembers us!

J. Thomas Shelley

#12
Quote from: Weedon on December 13, 2020, 08:02:37 PM
Sadly, Brian, most of those are defining "we" much  too narrowly: as in my living memory. We is actually larger than that. Our Church is larger than the living memory of the folks now breathing. And the great thing about the Church, as Chesterton once observed, is that it does not disenfranchise any by accident of death, just as the true democrat disenfranchises no one by accident of birth. Truth is, the Church IS anamnesis. She holds in her memory far more than this or that individual may recall. Because she is the memory of Him who is the lot and who in His infinite mercy remembers us!

Quote
"Tradition means giving votes to the most obscure of all classes, our ancestors. It is the democracy of the dead. Tradition refuses to submit to the small and arrogant oligarchy of those who merely happen to be walking about."

--G.K. Chesterton

Σοφία.  
Πρόσχωμεν.
Greek Orthodox Deacon - Ecumenical Patriarchate
Ordained to the Holy Diaconate Mary of Egypt Sunday A.D. 2022

Baptized, Confirmed, and Ordained United Methodist.
Served as a Lutheran Pastor October 31, 1989 - October 31, 2014.
Charter member of the first chapter of the Society of the Holy Trinity.

Brian Stoffregen

Quote from: J. Thomas Shelley on December 13, 2020, 08:10:53 PM
Quote from: Weedon on December 13, 2020, 08:02:37 PM
Sadly, Brian, most of those are defining "we" much  too narrowly: as in my living memory. We is actually larger than that. Our Church is larger than the living memory of the folks now breathing. And the great thing about the Church, as Chesterton once observed, is that it does not disenfranchise any by accident of death, just as the true democrat disenfranchises no one by accident of birth. Truth is, the Church IS anamnesis. She holds in her memory far more than this or that individual may recall. Because she is the memory of Him who is the lot and who in His infinite mercy remembers us!

Quote
"Tradition means giving votes to the most obscure of all classes, our ancestors. It is the democracy of the dead. Tradition refuses to submit to the small and arrogant oligarchy of those who merely happen to be walking about."

--G.K. Chesterton

Σοφία.  
Πρόσχωμεν.



I've heard the Chesterton quote before. I note that tradition gives a vote to the dead. They are not dictators. They have a voice in our deliberations, but we, the people walking around, also have a voice.


The motto of many in the church is: "If it ain't broke, don't fix it." (I've even had council members say that.)


A rephrasing I heard from health professionals: "You don't have to be sick to get healthier;" or, "It don't have to be broke to get better." Seeking to improve a Sunday school program or worship services doesn't mean that they were broke or bad.


A book dealing with the business world has the title, "If It Ain't Broke ... Break It." The author argues that if you are continually improving and remaking your business; the competition is doing that and will pass you by.


Another, related slogan, "Wrecked by Success." Businesses (and congregations) tend to keep doing what was successful until it becomes detrimental. Montgomery Wards, Sears, were very successful in their day, but failed to keep up with new business models of Walmart. And Walmart (and others) are trying to catch up to Amazon.


One church example I can think of was the Church's insistence on using Latin for worship and scripture. Unlike the koine Greek of the New Testament or the Vulgate (related to "vulgar") Latin translation; the church was no longer using the common language of the people; but created a church language that was foreign to the common pew sitter (or nave stander). Luther changed that a bit. However, there are churches today that consider 17th century English to be the language of proper worship and Scripture. I believe that holding on to such language traditions becomes detrimental to the mission of the church in the contemporary world.


Offering new translations of Scriptures and liturgical texts is giving the tradition an essential say, but also seeking to hear the voices of the contemporary world so that they are able to hear and understand the voices of the tradition. Does it hurt the tradition to call the Third Sunday in Advent, "Rejoice Sunday," rather than using the Latin word? Pew sitters will more easily make the connection between that name and the Introit and the Epistle from Philippians in the same way that pew sitters made such connections during the Latin masses.



I flunked retirement. Serving as a part-time interim in Ferndale, WA.

Dan Fienen

I also remember a mug that my wife gave me: "Dad's Motto: If it's not broken--take it apart anyway and loose some of the pieces, then it will be." I could suggest a variation on the Serenity Prayer for change makers: "God grant me the serenity to accept from the past what is good, The courage to change for the future what must, and The wisdom to perceive the difference." Not all change is good, not all that is past must be discarded, but some change is good, and some of the past damn well needs to be discarded. The challenge is to figure out which is which.
Pr. Daniel Fienen
LCMS

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