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A Few Gaudete Reflections

Started by Weedon, December 13, 2020, 11:20:30 AM

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Brian Stoffregen

Quote from: Dan Fienen on December 14, 2020, 01:24:48 PM
I also remember a mug that my wife gave me: "Dad's Motto: If it's not broken--take it apart anyway and loose some of the pieces, then it will be." I could suggest a variation on the Serenity Prayer for change makers: "God grant me the serenity to accept from the past what is good, The courage to change for the future what must, and The wisdom to perceive the difference." Not all change is good, not all that is past must be discarded, but some change is good, and some of the past damn well needs to be discarded. The challenge is to figure out which is which.


I agree. The past gets a vote, and so does the present, and we also consider what might be in the future.
I flunked retirement. Serving as a part-time interim in Ferndale, WA.

Randy Bosch

#16
Quote from: Brian Stoffregen on December 14, 2020, 01:32:22 PM
Quote from: Dan Fienen on December 14, 2020, 01:24:48 PM
I also remember a mug that my wife gave me: "Dad's Motto: If it's not broken--take it apart anyway and loose some of the pieces, then it will be." I could suggest a variation on the Serenity Prayer for change makers: "God grant me the serenity to accept from the past what is good, The courage to change for the future what must, and The wisdom to perceive the difference." Not all change is good, not all that is past must be discarded, but some change is good, and some of the past damn well needs to be discarded. The challenge is to figure out which is which.


I agree. The past gets a vote, and so does the present, and we also consider what might be in the future.

Yes.  Alan Jacobs, among other things a scholar and critic of all things John Ruskin learned from Ruskin that "We're living through a massive social transition.  Never forget what the world was before its change."

Gaudett reminds me that God exists before and after, and outside of time, and to never forget who He Is, or what the world was before its change by sinful humankind.
Ὑμεῖς ἐστε τὸ ἅλας τῆς γῆς· ἐὰν δὲ τὸ ἅλας μωρανθῇ, ἐν τίνι ἁλισθήσεται; εἰς οὐδὲν ἰσχύει ἔτι εἰ μὴ βληθὲν ἔξω καταπατεῖσθαι ὑπὸ τῶν ἀνθρώπων.

Weedon

The names of the Sundays in the historic series are a mix. Some are in English, particular the ordinary [=ordinal] Sundays such as the First Sunday after Epiphany or the Tenth after Trinity (or Pentecost). Some, though, still bear their Latin nick-names: Gaudete among them. I don't find Latin titles to be a problem for most folks once you explain their meaning, and lots of folks find language, well, interesting and fun. I literally had an email this morning from a lady asking me to do a show on the O Antiphons with their Latin titles because she finds that so fascinating (and I am on an upcoming Issues interview).

Gaudete, Invocab(v)it, Reminiscere, Oculi, Laetare, Judica, Palmarum, Quasimodogeniti (one of my favorites!), Miscericordia Domini, Jubilate, Cantate, Rogate...they all carry you along with a certain affection for the particular Mass or Divine Service being celebrated. Love them all and look forward to them as they make their way to us year by year.

And back to the O's, if you translate the Latin without giving it, you lose the surprise at the end: ERO CRAS. Which is part of their great fun!

Charles Austin

I understand the reason for moving away from the Latin, Pastor Weedon, but often I still miss it.
Iowa-born. Long-time in NY/New Jersey, former LWF staff in Geneva.
ELCA PASTOR, ordained 1967. Former journalist. Retired in Minneapolis. Often critical of the ELCA, but more often a defender of its mission. Ignoring the not-so-subtle rude insults which often appear here.

J. Thomas Shelley

#19
Quote from: Weedon on December 14, 2020, 02:26:47 PM
I literally had an email this morning from a lady asking me to do a show on the O Antiphons with their Latin titles because she finds that so fascinating (and I am on an upcoming Issues interview).

And back to the O's, if you translate the Latin without giving it, you lose the surprise at the end: ERO CRAS. Which is part of their great fun!

        LATIN   ENGLISH          GREEK      GERMAN

17   Sapiente   Wisdom           Sophia      Weisheit

18   Adonai   Adonai/Lord   Adonai/Kyrios   Adonai
   
19   Radix           Rod                   Ravdos      Spoub

20   Clavis   Key                    Kleidi      Schlussel

21   Oriens   Dayspring           Orien/Anatoli   Morgenstern

22   Rex          King                    Vasilias      Konig

23   Emmanuel   Emmanuel           Emmanuel      Immanuel

The *other* surprise ending is that the Hebrew "God is with us" is universal--like Alleluia and Amen.
Greek Orthodox Deacon - Ecumenical Patriarchate
Ordained to the Holy Diaconate Mary of Egypt Sunday A.D. 2022

Baptized, Confirmed, and Ordained United Methodist.
Served as a Lutheran Pastor October 31, 1989 - October 31, 2014.
Charter member of the first chapter of the Society of the Holy Trinity.

Weedon


J. Thomas Shelley

Quote from: Weedon on December 14, 2020, 02:59:57 PM
Radix = Root

Indeed. 

One source on the history of the O Antiphons states that following Vespers on the third evening the Cellarer would give each monk a present of a large radish.
Greek Orthodox Deacon - Ecumenical Patriarchate
Ordained to the Holy Diaconate Mary of Egypt Sunday A.D. 2022

Baptized, Confirmed, and Ordained United Methodist.
Served as a Lutheran Pastor October 31, 1989 - October 31, 2014.
Charter member of the first chapter of the Society of the Holy Trinity.

Mark Brown

Quote from: Tom Eckstein on December 13, 2020, 12:43:18 PM
Quote from: Weedon on December 13, 2020, 11:20:30 AM
I know that most folks don't use the historic lectionary, but in that lectionary today is the reason for the rose candle in the advent wreath, from the opening lines of the lntroit. Some reflections on the day:

https://weedon.blogspot.com/2020/12/gaudete.html

I sometimes need to correct my elders who light the advent wreath.  They sometimes assume the pink candle is for the 4th Sunday in Advent.  But their misunderstanding allows for a teaching moment.

This is in the same stream as some other things I've been thinking about.  I was taught that the pink candle was for Mary.  And the 4th Sunday is the Sunday that we typically read about Mary.  Hence that candle for the 4th.  Traditions, which are helpful and must be kept?  Which are unhelpful?  Which must change for the tradition to continue to live?

Weedon

Mark, we just need to get you on the historic series! Then your last Sunday will be John the Baptist from St. John 1. :) Honestly, though, we frequently do use the Luke 1 reading that day because it is so beautiful and goes so well with the Hymn of the Day: O Come, O Come, Emmanuel. Still, the rose is definitely NOT Mary's color (that would be blue in the tradition of Western art; and I think reddish in the tradition of iconography).

J. Thomas Shelley

Quote from: Weedon on December 14, 2020, 05:03:53 PM
Still, the rose is definitely NOT Mary's color (that would be blue in the tradition of Western art; and I think reddish in the tradition of iconography).
Iconography generally uses blue--the color of the sky--to denote the heavenly and reddish/ocre to denote the earthly.

The Theotokos is shown in blue because her fiat allowed her womb "to be made more spacious than the Heavens..." (Megalynarion of the Divine Liturgy of St. Basil).

In most Orthodox jurisdictions clergy are encouraged to use blue vestments for Feasts of the Theotokos; and, in some jurisdictions that use is encouraged on any Sunday(s) falling within Festal period (pre-Feast through Leavetaking of the Feast)

The Orthodox tend to be much more relaxed about liturgical colors than the West.  We don't live in the legacy of the Council of Trent.
Greek Orthodox Deacon - Ecumenical Patriarchate
Ordained to the Holy Diaconate Mary of Egypt Sunday A.D. 2022

Baptized, Confirmed, and Ordained United Methodist.
Served as a Lutheran Pastor October 31, 1989 - October 31, 2014.
Charter member of the first chapter of the Society of the Holy Trinity.

Weedon

#25
Thomas, but is she not usually depicted in a red or brownish garb? I am thinking that's how she appears in every ikon I have of her. As here:  https://s-media-cache-ak0.pinimg.com/736x/98/01/fd/9801fdecbe54cb3d48103e224817a098.jpg

Similarly, in the Western art, usually shown in a blue garb. As here: http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-HEDJ-yGf3q4/VA8qqHRzMlI/AAAAAAAAFvM/oTx_r_iSn4Q/s1600/The%2BBlessed%2BVirgin%2BMary%2B(shutterstock_22109203).jpg

Of course, in the West, her feasts are WHITE.


J.L. Precup

Yes, in western art, Mary is usually in blue, but even then her blouse is often red.  Up until the beginning of the 16th century, artists had difficulty making a suitable red paint.  Red paint was mostly derived from rust, but then an amazing item arrived from the new world:  cochineal.  Now artists could make a true red paint, and particularly the Italian artists went wild with it.  What is cochineal?  It's an insect found on cactus in Mexico.  Pre-conquest natives used cochineal to paint their buildings.
Keep watch, dear Lord, with those who work, or watch, or weep this night, and give your angels charge over those who sleep. Tend the sick, Lord Christ; give rest to the weary, bless the dying, soothe the suffering, pity the afflicted, shield the joyous; and all for your love's sake. Amen.

Weedon

Fascinating, Chaplain Precup. Ain't history grand? I love it!

mj4

Quote from: Charles Austin on December 14, 2020, 02:44:56 PM
I understand the reason for moving away from the Latin, Pastor Weedon, but often I still miss it.

I'm not aware of any Lutheran churches moving toward more Latin in the liturgy, but that's not to say that Latin has come into disuse. There are Roman Catholic churches fully embracing Latin usage. Some not so far away from you:

https://fsspminneapolis.org/


J. Eriksson

A couple of things:

1. aren't some of the Latin Sunday names taken from the first word of the Latin Introits? I miss the Introits and reading them has been part of my Sunday prep choosing hymns etc for Gaudate 'Rejoice all ye believers' seems an appropriate first hymn

2. When did Rose become the Lutheran liturgical color for the 3rd Sunday of advent?  Luther Reed lists purple as the liturgical color for it. p.468  LBW p 9 lists purple or blue.  My Japanese Anglican calendar shows purple as the liturgical color for the 3rd Sunday for 2021.

3. Iirc the church of my youth 1960s didn't much care what color the Advent candles were but just that we had them. A lot of members having survived the great depression when provincial gdp was actually negative had great difficulty giving themselves permission to spend money on consumables.  Pastors salary, missions and synod were much more important.   I'm quite convinced that those dear souls in the altar guild picked up next years candles at the post Christmas sales.

4.  Thinking about it with a little wax dye I have enough free wax(from wedding chapel stubbies) to make an violet /rose  set of Advent candles for all the churches in Hokkaido... my thanks to the thread for seeding this idea.  will it germinate?

James in japan
my best to all
I'm not a pastor.  Please don't call me one.

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