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New Thrivent Logo

Started by Rev. Edward Engelbrecht, June 17, 2020, 12:25:18 PM

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peter_speckhard

The Live Generously shirts are too popular in my house for me to complain about Thrivent.

Dan Fienen

Opposing life insurance at one time is increasingly apparent to be the unforgivable sin of the Missouri Synod. Never can we again be even marginally a good Lutheran body.
Pr. Daniel Fienen
LCMS

Dave Likeness

Today, Thrivent agents are still assigned to certain Lutheran parishes as part of their territory.

In days gone by, AAL offered free pencils, napkins and paper cups to each parish to promote
good will and get their logo some free publicity.

In former times, the AAL agent was more like a used car salesman who did not possess much
financial prowess.  Today, the Thrivent agent tries to come across as a financial planner who
might have a college diploma.






James_Gale

Quote from: Dan Fienen on June 17, 2020, 04:00:10 PM
Opposing life insurance at one time is increasingly apparent to be the unforgivable sin of the Missouri Synod. Never can we again be even marginally a good Lutheran body.


Nobody said anything of the sort.  I certainly didn't.  What happened in one congregation in 1912 made a big impression on my then eight-year-old grandmother.  That incident certainly doesn't define the LCMS today.  Heck, it likely wasn't representative of the LCMS even in 1912.


I shared my grandmother's story here only because it lined up with Pr. Preus's story.

John_Hannah

Quote from: James_Gale on June 17, 2020, 04:10:33 PM
Quote from: Dan Fienen on June 17, 2020, 04:00:10 PM
Opposing life insurance at one time is increasingly apparent to be the unforgivable sin of the Missouri Synod. Never can we again be even marginally a good Lutheran body.


Nobody said anything of the sort.  I certainly didn't.  What happened in one congregation in 1912 made a big impression on my then eight-year-old grandmother.  That incident certainly doesn't define the LCMS today.  Heck, it likely wasn't representative of the LCMS even in 1912.


I shared my grandmother's story here only because it lined up with Pr. Preus's story.

It was an important controversy then as illustrated by RD Preus, James Gale's grandmother's friends, and the Slovak American Lutheran split. It's part of our history.

Peace, JOHN
Pr. JOHN HANNAH, STS

James J Eivan

Quote from: John_Hannah on June 17, 2020, 04:48:06 PM
Quote from: James_Gale on June 17, 2020, 04:10:33 PM
Quote from: Dan Fienen on June 17, 2020, 04:00:10 PM
Opposing life insurance at one time is increasingly apparent to be the unforgivable sin of the Missouri Synod. Never can we again be even marginally a good Lutheran body.
Nobody said anything of the sort.  I certainly didn't.  What happened in one congregation in 1912 made a big impression on my then eight-year-old grandmother.  That incident certainly doesn't define the LCMS today.  Heck, it likely wasn't representative of the LCMS even in 1912.

I shared my grandmother's story here only because it lined up with Pr. Preus's story.
It was an important controversy then as illustrated by RD Preus, James Gale's grandmother's friends, and the Slovak American Lutheran split. It's part of our history.

Peace, JOHN
True ... in the current environment of purging historically questioned landmarks, it is encouraging to have history openly discussed.

Charles Austin

Pastor Fienen:
Opposing life insurance at one time is increasingly apparent to be the unforgivable sin of the Missouri Synod. Never can we again be even marginally a good Lutheran body.
Me:
Yes, by God, you got it! The fact that you once opposed life insurance makes you unworthy people, a shame which will apply to you well into the 25th century. Isn't that very sensible, logical and clear? Not!
Good grief, you do love pretending to be a victim of unfair criticism.
Iowa-born. ELCA pastor, ordained 1967. Former journalist. Retired in Minneapolis. English major. Elitist snob? Probably.

J. Thomas Shelley

The aversion to insurance continues to this day among the Amish and conservative Mennonites.

I had never heard of that among Lutherans until now.
Greek Orthodox Deacon - Ecumenical Patriarchate
Ordained to the Holy Diaconate Mary of Egypt Sunday A.D. 2022

Baptized, Confirmed, and Ordained United Methodist.
Served as a Lutheran Pastor October 31, 1989 - October 31, 2014.
Charter member of the first chapter of the Society of the Holy Trinity.

James J Eivan

Quote from: Charles Austin on June 17, 2020, 05:54:50 PM
Yes, by God, you got it! The fact that you once opposed life insurance makes you unworthy people, a shame which will apply to you well into the 25th century. Isn't that very sensible, logical and clear? Not! <Emphasis Added>
The fact that one would make the emphasized statement ... even allegedly in jest ... is extremely telling.  :(

Terry W Culler

Quote from: J. Thomas Shelley on June 17, 2020, 06:03:14 PM
The aversion to insurance continues to this day among the Amish and conservative Mennonites.

I had never heard of that among Lutherans until now.


I live in an area with many conservative Mennonites and am somewhat familiar with their ways here at least.  It's not that they have no insurance but that their insurance does not come from a company but from their congregation(s).  If someone is in financial need due to death or illness, they take care of each other.  A rather radical, New Testament kind of thing which I admire.  Would we could do a better job of taking care of our own.
"No particular Church has ... a right to existence, except as it believes itself the most perfect from of Christianity, the form which of right, should and will be universal."
Charles Porterfield Krauth

Norman Teigen

I remember my late father telling me that he didn't understand why people thought that they were doing church work by buying AAL insurance.  The cups, napkins, and placemats hardly qualified as church work. He also told me that Governor Preus wanted to posture Lutheran Brotherhood  as an antidote to lodge membership.  A good Lutheran wouldn't want to become a lodge member, after all.  I don't get the discussion about the logo.  It looks like a tiny heart  placed on top of the t.  FWIW, Thrivent is one of the major commercial entities of Minneapolis with a prominent building in the downtown area of the city.
Norman Teigen

Brian Stoffregen

Quote from: Pr. Terry Culler on June 18, 2020, 07:30:42 AM
Quote from: J. Thomas Shelley on June 17, 2020, 06:03:14 PM
The aversion to insurance continues to this day among the Amish and conservative Mennonites.

I had never heard of that among Lutherans until now.


I live in an area with many conservative Mennonites and am somewhat familiar with their ways here at least.  It's not that they have no insurance but that their insurance does not come from a company but from their congregation(s).  If someone is in financial need due to death or illness, they take care of each other.  A rather radical, New Testament kind of thing which I admire.  Would we could do a better job of taking care of our own.


I've known of congregations who had a "Good Samaritan Fund" or under some other name, that was used to help people in need. One congregation had people contribute to that in honor of or in memory of, rather than donate flowers and the names would be printed in the bulletin.
I flunked retirement. Serving as a part-time interim in Ferndale, WA.

Timothy Schenks

This brought back some memories:

"If the study of doctrine is not the number one priority at synodical conventions, then one of two things will happen: Either the convention will be manufacturing laws, or even worse, it will degenerate into an affair of mutual praise, love, assurance, and life insurance."

(Walther, Duties of an Evangelical Lutheran Synod, At Home in the House of my Fathers, 301)
LCMS Layman

Terry W Culler

Quote from: Brian Stoffregen on June 18, 2020, 01:15:17 PM
Quote from: Pr. Terry Culler on June 18, 2020, 07:30:42 AM
Quote from: J. Thomas Shelley on June 17, 2020, 06:03:14 PM
The aversion to insurance continues to this day among the Amish and conservative Mennonites.

I had never heard of that among Lutherans until now.


I live in an area with many conservative Mennonites and am somewhat familiar with their ways here at least.  It's not that they have no insurance but that their insurance does not come from a company but from their congregation(s).  If someone is in financial need due to death or illness, they take care of each other.  A rather radical, New Testament kind of thing which I admire.  Would we could do a better job of taking care of our own.


I've known of congregations who had a "Good Samaritan Fund" or under some other name, that was used to help people in need. One congregation had people contribute to that in honor of or in memory of, rather than donate flowers and the names would be printed in the bulletin.


We don't have a specific fund for that but we have a commitment that 40% of the money given for benevolence goes to local needs which sometimes includes individuals and sometimes organizations
"No particular Church has ... a right to existence, except as it believes itself the most perfect from of Christianity, the form which of right, should and will be universal."
Charles Porterfield Krauth

Matt Hummel

Quote from: Pr. Terry Culler on June 18, 2020, 07:30:42 AM
Quote from: J. Thomas Shelley on June 17, 2020, 06:03:14 PM
The aversion to insurance continues to this day among the Amish and conservative Mennonites.

I had never heard of that among Lutherans until now.


I live in an area with many conservative Mennonites and am somewhat familiar with their ways here at least.  It's not that they have no insurance but that their insurance does not come from a company but from their congregation(s).  If someone is in financial need due to death or illness, they take care of each other.  A rather radical, New Testament kind of thing which I admire.  Would we could do a better job of taking care of our own.

That they do, and they pay cash up front, which often times means they can get a sizable discount, since the practitioner/institution can avoid the layers of bureaucracy in Government and Insurance companies. Which speaks volumes about why health care costs can be so high.
Matt Hummel


"The chief purpose of life, for any of us, is to increase according to our capacity our knowledge of God by all means we have, and to be moved by it to praise and thanks."

― J.R.R. Tolkien

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