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Started by mariemeyer, October 23, 2020, 10:00:43 AM

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Rev. Edward Engelbrecht

Eliza Moore (1843 – January 21, 1948) was one of the last living African Americans proven to have been born into slavery in the United States. Moore was born a slave in Montgomery County, Alabama, in 1843.

In Brown v. Board of Education, 347 U.S. 483 (1954), the Supreme Court outlawed segregated public education facilities for blacks and whites at the state level. The Civil Rights Act of 1964 superseded all state and local laws requiring segregation.

The dates in the above matters were recent, too. There is affirmative action policy but I suppose Matt would question it's equity as reparation. The Indian affairs issues go back many years, too.

Are there examples from other countries handling reparations for slavery?

James S. Rustad

Quote from: Rev. Edward Engelbrecht on November 02, 2020, 06:37:21 AM
Are there examples from other countries handling reparations for slavery?

That's a very interesting question given that the USA is not the only country to have had legal slavery.
"Malo periculosam, libertatem quam quietam servitutem." -Thomas Jefferson

Jeremy_Loesch

Quote from: passerby on November 01, 2020, 05:49:57 PM
Quote from: Jeremy_Loesch on October 30, 2020, 10:15:07 PM
I get one present from my parents every two years...a su scription to LF/FL. They don't need to get me any gift, but this makes them content. I rarely read LF. I just don't find it that interesting.  I look at the table of contents to see if I recognize any names. If I do, then I scan the article. I do look forward to FL, because that is more interesting. (I recognize that this may say something about my attention span.) But I look forward to reading what Richard and Peter write.

FL is good.
LF has not much to offer.

The mobbing issue was tremendously disappointing. I know ganga ainm personally and the lack of journalistic integrity was, even for something like LF, was rotten.

Jeremy
I think it is quite a good journal. It was at its best under Sarah Hinlicky's editorship. It seemed to be staying within the bounds of orthodoxy while reaching out to other Lutherans and Christians outside the American evangelical Catholic fold (in contrast to Paul Sauer, Ronald Bagnal (sp.) Leonard Klein, and Paul Hinlicky, however venerable these churchman were/are). My verdict is not in on Nelson yet, though he seems closer to Sarah H. in editing under a broad orthodoxy, even if he is bringing in a more political element. It's not always going to please hard-line evangelical catholics (to the extent they haven't swam the Tiber or Bosphorous yet) or the LCMS conservatives.  But, hey, it's not a church body or a doctrinal statement the ALPB is making you sign or join; why not subscribe, especially during this time of shrinkage of Lutheran institutions and resources? Advertisement ended.

Thanks for the comments Passerby. I appreciate reading them.

I get four journals. I'll rank them in order of what I would read first: First Things, Concordia Theological Quarterly, Concordia Journal, Lutheran Forum.

LF is okay but it's just not at the top of my list of things to read.

Jeremy

mariemeyer

Quote from: Jeremy_Loesch on November 02, 2020, 02:24:34 PM
Quote from: passerby on November 01, 2020, 05:49:57 PM
Quote from: Jeremy_Loesch on October 30, 2020, 10:15:07 PM
I get one present from my parents every two years...a su scription to LF/FL. They don't need to get me any gift, but this makes them content. I rarely read LF. I just don't find it that interesting.  I look at the table of contents to see if I recognize any names. If I do, then I scan the article. I do look forward to FL, because that is more interesting. (I recognize that this may say something about my attention span.) But I look forward to reading what Richard and Peter write.

FL is good.
LF has not much to offer.

The mobbing issue was tremendously disappointing. I know ganga ainm personally and the lack of journalistic integrity was, even for something like LF, was rotten.

Jeremy
I think it is quite a good journal. It was at its best under Sarah Hinlicky's editorship. It seemed to be staying within the bounds of orthodoxy while reaching out to other Lutherans and Christians outside the American evangelical Catholic fold (in contrast to Paul Sauer, Ronald Bagnal (sp.) Leonard Klein, and Paul Hinlicky, however venerable these churchman were/are). My verdict is not in on Nelson yet, though he seems closer to Sarah H. in editing under a broad orthodoxy, even if he is bringing in a more political element. It's not always going to please hard-line evangelical catholics (to the extent they haven't swam the Tiber or Bosphorous yet) or the LCMS conservatives.  But, hey, it's not a church body or a doctrinal statement the ALPB is making you sign or join; why not subscribe, especially during this time of shrinkage of Lutheran institutions and resources? Advertisement ended.

Thanks for the comments Passerby. I appreciate reading them.

I get four journals. I'll rank them in order of what I would read first: First Things, Concordia Theological Quarterly, Concordia Journal, Lutheran Forum.

LF is okay but it's just not at the top of my list of things to read.

Jeremy

Jeremy: I read the same Journals.  One difference, I rate them Lutheran Forum, Concordia Journal, Concordia Theological Quarterly and First Things.   I also read Christianity Today  - a good source to understand how Orthodox Evangelical Christians understand Biblical discipleship.

Marie Meyer

Jeremy_Loesch

Quote from: mariemeyer on November 02, 2020, 05:09:51 PM
Quote from: Jeremy_Loesch on November 02, 2020, 02:24:34 PM
Quote from: passerby on November 01, 2020, 05:49:57 PM
Quote from: Jeremy_Loesch on October 30, 2020, 10:15:07 PM
I get one present from my parents every two years...a su scription to LF/FL. They don't need to get me any gift, but this makes them content. I rarely read LF. I just don't find it that interesting.  I look at the table of contents to see if I recognize any names. If I do, then I scan the article. I do look forward to FL, because that is more interesting. (I recognize that this may say something about my attention span.) But I look forward to reading what Richard and Peter write.

FL is good.
LF has not much to offer.

The mobbing issue was tremendously disappointing. I know ganga ainm personally and the lack of journalistic integrity was, even for something like LF, was rotten.

Jeremy
I think it is quite a good journal. It was at its best under Sarah Hinlicky's editorship. It seemed to be staying within the bounds of orthodoxy while reaching out to other Lutherans and Christians outside the American evangelical Catholic fold (in contrast to Paul Sauer, Ronald Bagnal (sp.) Leonard Klein, and Paul Hinlicky, however venerable these churchman were/are). My verdict is not in on Nelson yet, though he seems closer to Sarah H. in editing under a broad orthodoxy, even if he is bringing in a more political element. It's not always going to please hard-line evangelical catholics (to the extent they haven't swam the Tiber or Bosphorous yet) or the LCMS conservatives.  But, hey, it's not a church body or a doctrinal statement the ALPB is making you sign or join; why not subscribe, especially during this time of shrinkage of Lutheran institutions and resources? Advertisement ended.

Thanks for the comments Passerby. I appreciate reading them.

I get four journals. I'll rank them in order of what I would read first: First Things, Concordia Theological Quarterly, Concordia Journal, Lutheran Forum.

LF is okay but it's just not at the top of my list of things to read.

Jeremy

Jeremy: I read the same Journals.  One difference, I rate them Lutheran Forum, Concordia Journal, Concordia Theological Quarterly and First Things.   I also read Christianity Today  - a good source to understand how Orthodox Evangelical Christians understand Biblical discipleship.

Marie Meyer

Nice! And with a lot of things, the issues of each one will vary in terms of my interest level. I think it was the most recent CJ that was quite interesting to me.

Jeremy

mj4

Quote from: James S. Rustad on November 02, 2020, 12:24:54 PM
Quote from: Rev. Edward Engelbrecht on November 02, 2020, 06:37:21 AM
Are there examples from other countries handling reparations for slavery?

That's a very interesting question given that the USA is not the only country to have had legal slavery.

I recall that Germany paid WW2 reparations to Israel. Also, Volkswagen, having used slave labor during the war, paid reparations to survivors.

Rev. Edward Engelbrecht

Quote from: mj4 on November 03, 2020, 12:26:03 AM
Quote from: James S. Rustad on November 02, 2020, 12:24:54 PM
Quote from: Rev. Edward Engelbrecht on November 02, 2020, 06:37:21 AM
Are there examples from other countries handling reparations for slavery?

That's a very interesting question given that the USA is not the only country to have had legal slavery.

I recall that Germany paid WW2 reparations to Israel. Also, Volkswagen, having used slave labor during the war, paid reparations to survivors.

Here's a BBC article on reparations internationally.

https://www.bbc.co.uk/newsround/53531055

passerby

Quote from: Jeremy_Loesch on November 02, 2020, 10:02:21 PM
Quote from: mariemeyer on November 02, 2020, 05:09:51 PM
Quote from: Jeremy_Loesch on November 02, 2020, 02:24:34 PM
Quote from: passerby on November 01, 2020, 05:49:57 PM
Quote from: Jeremy_Loesch on October 30, 2020, 10:15:07 PM
I get one present from my parents every two years...a su scription to LF/FL. They don't need to get me any gift, but this makes them content. I rarely read LF. I just don't find it that interesting.  I look at the table of contents to see if I recognize any names. If I do, then I scan the article. I do look forward to FL, because that is more interesting. (I recognize that this may say something about my attention span.) But I look forward to reading what Richard and Peter write.

FL is good.
LF has not much to offer.

The mobbing issue was tremendously disappointing. I know ganga ainm personally and the lack of journalistic integrity was, even for something like LF, was rotten.

Jeremy
I think it is quite a good journal. It was at its best under Sarah Hinlicky's editorship. It seemed to be staying within the bounds of orthodoxy while reaching out to other Lutherans and Christians outside the American evangelical Catholic fold (in contrast to Paul Sauer, Ronald Bagnal (sp.) Leonard Klein, and Paul Hinlicky, however venerable these churchman were/are). My verdict is not in on Nelson yet, though he seems closer to Sarah H. in editing under a broad orthodoxy, even if he is bringing in a more political element. It's not always going to please hard-line evangelical catholics (to the extent they haven't swam the Tiber or Bosphorous yet) or the LCMS conservatives.  But, hey, it's not a church body or a doctrinal statement the ALPB is making you sign or join; why not subscribe, especially during this time of shrinkage of Lutheran institutions and resources? Advertisement ended.

Thanks for the comments Passerby. I appreciate reading them.

I get four journals. I'll rank them in order of what I would read first: First Things, Concordia Theological Quarterly, Concordia Journal, Lutheran Forum.

LF is okay but it's just not at the top of my list of things to read.

Jeremy

Jeremy: I read the same Journals.  One difference, I rate them Lutheran Forum, Concordia Journal, Concordia Theological Quarterly and First Things.   I also read Christianity Today  - a good source to understand how Orthodox Evangelical Christians understand Biblical discipleship.

Marie Meyer

Nice! And with a lot of things, the issues of each one will vary in terms of my interest level. I think it was the most recent CJ that was quite interesting to me.

Jeremy
The Cresset put out by Valporaiso U, used to be  favorite, although I lost touch with it. Mockingbird is 'Lutheranish" and interesting reading, although quite expensive.
Richard Cimino

passerby

And I  forgot Lutheran Quarterly. Is very interesting, though focused on Lutheran (and Luther) history and runs too few articles on contemporary Lutheranism.
Richard Cimino

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