How about something a little different for a change...

Started by RogerMartim, February 25, 2015, 09:18:51 PM

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John Mundinger

#15
Quote from: Mike in Ohio on February 25, 2015, 09:29:10 PM
Bach's St. Matthew Passion, particularly the opening passage.

The Helena Symphony will be performing the St. Matthew passion, coincidentally on Holy Saturday.  We will do it in a manner similar to the way that Simon Rattle performed it with the Berlin Philharmonic, i.e. an oratorio, but with a bit of staging.  Here is a sample of how Rattle did it:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9jb-W7vtvBo

Quote from: GalRevRedux on February 25, 2015, 09:37:31 PM
Brahms' Requiem.

Agreed!  Wie lieblich sind Deine Wohnunung, Herr Zabaoth!  However, there is something very special about the fifth movement.

Quote from: John_Hannah on February 26, 2015, 06:18:53 AMBach, Mass in B Minor.

All of Bach's music is special.  Without question, the B minor Mass is the most difficult on the list.
Lifelong Evangelical Lutheran layman

Whoever, then, thinks that he understands the Holy Scriptures, or any part of them, but puts such an interpretation upon them as does not tend to build up this twofold love of God and our neighbour, does not yet understand them as he ought.  St. Augustine

Birkholz

Bach- B Minor Mass
Rachmaninoff- Vespers
Arvo Part- De Profundis
Pastor Mark Birkholz
Zion Lutheran Church
Naperville, IL
www.zionnaperville.org

mariemeyer

Bach's Mass in B Minor.

Bach's March 21st Birthday comes close to be a holy day and cause for celebration. For years WQXR, the New York Times station, dedicated the day to music by Bach.

Marie Meyer

peterm

Mass in B minor

Rachmaninoff vespers

and although not especially liturgical in the sense you mean I would add Handel's Messiah.  I particularly like the Bass and trumpet back and forth on We Shall be changed...and the opening tenor solo of Isaiah 40.
Rev. Peter Morlock- ELCA pastor serving two congregations in WIS

Dan Fienen

Tune: Gustav Holst, Thaxted; Te Deum paraphrase by Stephen Starke,  "We Praise You and Acknowledge You"

Pr. Daniel Fienen
LCMS

Jeremy Loesch

Praise to the Lord, the F. Melius Christiansen arrangement, performed by the St. Olaf choir 1975.
http://youtu.be/-dLDrs4ORmc

Jeremy
A Lutheran pastor growing into all sorts of things.

Eileen Smith

Quote from: mariemeyer on February 26, 2015, 09:39:21 AM
Bach's Mass in B Minor.

Bach's March 21st Birthday comes close to be a holy day and cause for celebration. For years WQXR, the New York Times station, dedicated the day to music by Bach.

Marie Meyer

Marie, in 1985 William F. Buckley wrote an article on the 300th anniversary of Bach's birth.  It's a short, beautiful article and I'd like to share just some of it with you here:

"Three hundred years ago today, Johann Sebastian Bach was born.  It is as through God had decided to clear His throat to remind the world of His existence...   Bach has the impact of a testimonial to God's providence not because he wrote the most searingly beautiful church music ever heard (about The Passion According to S t. Matthew one can say only that it does credit to the Gospel according to St. Matthew), but because he wrote the most beautiful music ever written.  If one were to throw away the three hundred cantatas, the hundred-odd chorale preludes, the three oratorios, the Passions, and the Mass, which would be the equivalent of destroying half of Shakespear, still the other half would sustain Bach as a creature whose afflatus is inexplicable in the absence of a belief in God....  If a human being exists who is unmoved by the B-minor Mass, it should not surprise that human beings exist who are unmoved by democracy, or freedom, or peace.  They have eyes but they do not see, ears but they do not hear.  Well, Bach tended to end his manuscripts with the initials "SDG" -- Soli Deo gloria, To God alone the glory.  But God shares that glory, and did so three hundred years ago when Johann Sebastian was born." 

Jeremy Loesch

A musical custom of the churches I have served is to close the Advent and Lent evening services with an evening hymn.  The body of evening hymns in the hymnals are really good!  Last night we did "Now the Light Has Gone Away."  The secretary of the church said she remembered singing that one as a little girl.  My remembrances are learning it while singing in the Kapelle of Concordia, River Forest.  Dr. Tom Gieschen was the director there for two of my years with the choir.  We even sang it in German- Mude bin ich, geh zur Ruh.  Here is a cute recording.
http://youtu.be/PaSazYvPN6w

Jeremy
A Lutheran pastor growing into all sorts of things.

peter_speckhard

For personal reasons related to doing the funeral of our stillborn daughter, I would pick

And the glory of the Lord shall be revealed and all flesh shall see it together, for the mouth of the Lord hath spoken it from Handel's Messiah. Even typing the words makes me want to listen to it.

Weedon

#24
Bach B minor Mass (especially the haunting Kyrie)
Rachmaninoff All-Night Vespers (especially the Rejoice, O Virgin)
Schütz's Christmas Vespers
Praetorius' Mass for Christmas Day (all of it, but that In Dulci at the end...wow!)
Gretchaninoff's Our Father
and more recently, Arvo Pärt's Te Deum

Rev. BT Ball

The Common Service

Mass in B minor

"And He shall purify the Sons of Levi" from the Messiah.

RogerMartim

Keep this thread going. We have enough of this heavy crap going on.

I am going to ask my niece with a lovely soprano voice to sing Pie Jesu from Faure's Requiem at my funeral.

I don't plan on going anytime soon though.

Jeff-MN

#27
Healey Willan composed a setting of the Common Service ("page 15") that I've heard is really good.  Has anyone ever seen any recordings of this setting online?

FatherWilliam57

There seems to be a general pattern here:  "If it ain't Baroque, don't fix it."  Digging a little further back, though, I like Guillaume de Machaut's Messe de Notre Dame written for the Mass of Purification of the Blessed Virgin (February 2nd).  Here you go, Luther Man:  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=11A4wqv8_wo
The Rev. William B. Henry, Jr.
Interim Pastor, St. Peter's Lutheran Church, Evans City, PA
"Put on the whole armor of God."

Rev. BT Ball

Quote from: Jeff-MN on February 26, 2015, 10:24:49 PM
Healey Willan composed a setting of the Common Service ("page 15") that I've heard is really good.  Has anyone ever seen any recordings of this setting online?

Redeemer Lutheran Church in Ft. Wayne uses the Willan setting exclusively on the Lord's Day. 

Here is a bit from their website on their usage of it. 

http://www.redeemer-fortwayne.org/

The Willan Setting

The Lutheran Church—Missouri Synod commissioned Canadian composer Healey Willan to create a new musical setting for the Order of Holy Communion on page 15 of the The Lutheran Hymnal (1941). The Service was published by the Commission on Worship in 1959, and the congregations of the LCMS were encouraged to use this setting. Because it is more musically intricate and complicated than that in TLH it was not heartily embraced by the congregations at large. It did take hold at Redeemer, though. We find it to be the finest musical setting for congregational singing ever composed. Even though the synod has left it behind and it was never published in a bound book, it is, nonetheless, one of the synod's authorized orders, and we still use it for all Sunday Services and high feasts outside of Advent and Lent. Because the latest hymnal committee chose not to include this setting, we use the hymnal for hymns but print the order of service in the bulletin.

Yes, the music is more "difficult" than typical congregational music. It requires serious initial effort and practice on the part of our congregational members. We believe, however, that the effort pays off. The music, for all its complexity, is very beautiful and seems to grow in appeal over time, once people get comfortable with it. It carries the sacred text remarkably well, too. We recognize, though, that its complexity can be very off-putting to those who expect our service to be the same as that of their home church and are looking for the comfort of familiarity. If it is any consolation to them, we use Divine Service III from the LSB or page 15 from TLH during Advent, Lent, and Midweek Services.


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