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New French Church

Started by RogerMartim, July 08, 2013, 04:21:22 PM

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RogerMartim

A friend of mine sent this to me in an e-mail and I verified it in The Lutheran magazine. With the deterioration of faith in many parts of Europe I suppose this was the way to go in France. The article was too sparse to determine what was agreed upon and what was compromised in the theological positions of both the Lutheran Church and the Reformed Church of France. The two church bodies did have great differences at one time. I don't foresee a great revival or renewal of the church though.

From the July issue of The Lutheran:
French Protestants Unite
The Evangelical Lutheran Church of France and the Reformed Church of France officially united May 11 to form the 400,000-member United Protestant Church of France. That's in a country where more than half of the population now claims to be agnostic or atheist, said Laurent Schlumberger, national council president of the new church. Schlumberger told Ecumenical News that "for five centuries, being Protestant in France meant not being Catholic. ... But that world has changed. ... French Protestantism can no longer exist by defining itself over against another religious group."


LutherMan

I fully expect to see this type of merger between TEC & ELCA down the road...

BrotherBoris

This is good news?  Sounds to me like it is a watered-down merger, much like old Frederick the Great's Prussian Union of 1817 that joined together the Lutheran and Reformed Churches.  And the modern day ancestors of that (at least in the USA) are the UCC (the old Evangelical and Reformed Church wing) and the LCMS (formed in large part by conservative German Lutherans who refused to go along with Frederick's merger.

RogerMartim

Brother Boris, this is not good news to me. I'm just a reporter. I decry the dilution of what was so succinctly expressed in the Augsburg Confession. Again, I don't know how much compromise was made, but in this day and age with ecumenism, I wouldn't think that The United Protestant Church of France is the way to go.

BrotherBoris

I wonder if there is any "rump" Lutheran group that refused to go along with this? Or for that matter, a "rump" Reformed group that refused for the same reasons?

Team Hesse

Quote from: BrotherBoris on July 08, 2013, 06:02:34 PM
This is good news?  Sounds to me like it is a watered-down merger, much like old Frederick the Great's Prussian Union of 1817 that joined together the Lutheran and Reformed Churches.  And the modern day ancestors of that (at least in the USA) are the UCC (the old Evangelical and Reformed Church wing) and the LCMS (formed in large part by conservative German Lutherans who refused to go along with Frederick's merger.


Frederick the Great died in 1786. Frederick William III was the monarch who attempted the Prussian Union.


Lou

BrotherBoris

Quote from: Team Hesse on July 08, 2013, 06:39:04 PM
Quote from: BrotherBoris on July 08, 2013, 06:02:34 PM
This is good news?  Sounds to me like it is a watered-down merger, much like old Frederick the Great's Prussian Union of 1817 that joined together the Lutheran and Reformed Churches.  And the modern day ancestors of that (at least in the USA) are the UCC (the old Evangelical and Reformed Church wing) and the LCMS (formed in large part by conservative German Lutherans who refused to go along with Frederick's merger.


Frederick the Great died in 1786. Frederick William III was the monarch who attempted the Prussian Union.


Lou


Ooops!  Thanks for the correction.

Steven Tibbetts

Quote from: BrotherBoris on July 08, 2013, 06:24:30 PM
I wonder if there is any "rump" Lutheran group that refused to go along with this? Or for that matter, a "rump" Reformed group that refused for the same reasons?

The Evangelical Lutheran Church in France and the Reformed Church in France actually committed to this merger some 6 years ago. These Lutherans had about 36,000 members, all in Alsace-Lorraine, territory that historically switched between German and French rule, depending upon the conclusion of the latest war.

There is a larger (220,000 members) Protestant Church of the Augsburg Confession of Alsace and Lorraine. However its ministerium has joined with that of the Protestant Reformed Church of Alsace and Lorraine, though the the 2 church organizations continue to exist separately while also presenting themselves over the last decade as the Union of Protestant Churches in Alsace and Lorraine.

There is also the Evangelical Lutheran Church – Synod of France and Belgium, which is part of the International Lutheran Council.

Pax, Steven+
The Rev. Steven Paul Tibbetts, STS
Pastor Zip's Blog

LutherMan

Can this new church seek membership in the LWF?

Steven Tibbetts

Quote from: LutherMan on July 08, 2013, 07:26:50 PM
Can this new church seek membership in the LWF?

The Lutheran side has been an LWF church. As long as the Augsburg Confession remains part of its faith, yes, it can seek membership.

Especially since the Leuenberg Agreement, the number of churches that are members of both the LWF and the World Communion of Reformed Churches has grown. I'm thinking the largest of these, in terms of membership, would be the Ethiopian Evangelical Church Mekane Yesus.

Pax, Steven+
The Rev. Steven Paul Tibbetts, STS
Pastor Zip's Blog

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