Beliefs of Fundamentalists Christians

Started by Dave Likeness, April 21, 2013, 09:44:24 PM

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Don Whitbeck

Quote from: Matt Staneck on April 23, 2013, 12:06:10 PM
Pr. Likeness,

I'm very confident that my class is not interested in these fights. I offered those comments because from time to time I see around here a grasping at repristination that we're just not interested in.  In other words, tell us everything you know about preaching, hospital visits, communication in the parish, etc.  But these other things are not on our radar.  All I'm saying.

M. Staneck

Hello Matt:

Maybe good idea for you to start your own discussions.  You can express these ideas or concerns in a form of Discussion. I'm sure many would love to give their input and experiences, related to any subject you wish to address on ALPB.

Respectfully,

The Voice of God will NEVER Contradict the Word of God

Jay Michael

Quote from: John Mundinger on April 23, 2013, 11:36:27 AM
Quote from: Jay. on April 23, 2013, 11:31:40 AM
Quote from: John Mundinger on April 23, 2013, 10:50:22 AM
The notion of promoting the idea that we are still worshiping in "my grandfather's church" is bogus.  We ought to be the church in which our grandchildren will be worshiping!
What is you concept of the term "my grandfather's church"?
As the folks at the Brothers of John the Steadfast.
Pointing to an organization is hardly an explaination as to what YOU are condemning when referring to "my grandfather's church."

In YOUR own words please Mr. Mundinger.

Don Whitbeck

What I miss most in My Parents, and My Grand Fathers, and His Parents, is Version of the Communion Service from the 1944 Version of the Lutheran Hymnal.
The Voice of God will NEVER Contradict the Word of God

Jay Michael

Quote from: Confessional Lutheran on April 23, 2013, 03:46:58 PM
What I miss most in My Parents, and My Grand Fathers, and His Parents, is Version of the Communion Service from the 1944 Version of the Lutheran Hymnal.
1941 Version of The Lutheran Hymnal?

LutherMan

Quote from: Confessional Lutheran on April 23, 2013, 03:46:58 PM
What I miss most in My Parents, and My Grand Fathers, and His Parents, is Version of the Communion Service from the 1944 Version of the Lutheran Hymnal.
The service is included in Lutheran Service Book...

Jay Michael

Quote from: LutherMan on April 23, 2013, 04:42:59 PM
Quote from: Confessional Lutheran on April 23, 2013, 03:46:58 PM
What I miss most in My Parents, and My Grand Fathers, and His Parents, is Version of the Communion Service from the 1944 Version of the Lutheran Hymnal.
The service is included in Lutheran Service Book...
Almost ... the sung liturgy retained the 1941 wording ... the spoken liturgy contains update language. ;)

John Mundinger

Quote from: Jay. on April 23, 2013, 03:12:25 PMPointing to an organization is hardly an explaination as to what YOU are condemning when referring to "my grandfather's church."

Jay - in this case, pointing to BJS is the best explanation that I can offer because the phrase is theirs, not mine.
Lifelong Evangelical Lutheran layman

Whoever, then, thinks that he understands the Holy Scriptures, or any part of them, but puts such an interpretation upon them as does not tend to build up this twofold love of God and our neighbour, does not yet understand them as he ought.  St. Augustine

Jay Michael

Quote from: John Mundinger on April 23, 2013, 07:16:34 PM
Quote from: Jay. on April 23, 2013, 03:12:25 PMPointing to an organization is hardly an explaination as to what YOU are condemning when referring to "my grandfather's church."
Jay - in this case, pointing to BJS is the best explanation that I can offer because the phrase is theirs, not mine.
Problem is that BJS clearly uses the term in a positive way ... you on the other hand clearly use the term with a great amount of angst and disdain ... which still begs the question of how and why you view the phrase "my grandfather's church" in the manner you do.

John Mundinger

Quote from: Jay. on April 23, 2013, 07:40:27 PMProblem is that BJS clearly uses the term in a positive way ... you on the other hand clearly use the term with a great amount of angst and disdain ... which still begs the question of how and why you view the phrase "my grandfather's church" in the manner you do.

Context, Jay.  I responded to a reference to repristination. 
Lifelong Evangelical Lutheran layman

Whoever, then, thinks that he understands the Holy Scriptures, or any part of them, but puts such an interpretation upon them as does not tend to build up this twofold love of God and our neighbour, does not yet understand them as he ought.  St. Augustine

Jeff-MN

        FUNDAMENTALISM

DENIAL OF THE WORD OF GOD
   when it comes to baptism, 
           the eucharist,
       and holy ordination.



Jay Michael

Quote from: John Mundinger on April 23, 2013, 08:11:27 PM
Quote from: Jay. on April 23, 2013, 07:40:27 PMProblem is that BJS clearly uses the term in a positive way ... you on the other hand clearly use the term with a great amount of angst and disdain ... which still begs the question of how and why you view the phrase "my grandfather's church" in the manner you do.
Context, Jay.  I responded to a reference to repristination.
Yup ... context ....
Quote from: John Mundinger on April 23, 2013, 10:50:22 AM
In my opinion, the short-coming in the LCMS is that there are too many interested in a rose-colored repristination of not just LCMS history but Lutheran history.  The notion of promoting the idea that we are still worshiping in "my grandfather's church" is bogus.  We ought to be the church in which our grandchildren will be worshiping!
... and you stated "I responded to a reference to repristination."  Defining "repristination" as "renewal of purity" you apparently feel the renewal of purity is bogus. 

Is contending for the faith once delivered by the saints really that bogus?

John Mundinger

Quote from: Jay. on April 23, 2013, 09:32:09 PM... and you stated "I responded to a reference to repristination."  Defining "repristination" as "renewal of purity" you apparently feel the renewal of purity is bogus. 

Renewing purity is not bogus.  But, I don't think that was how that term was used in the post to which I responded and I'm not convinced that perpetuating grandfathers' churches is necessarily and exercise in renewing purity is, either.  The challenge is to know what to hold onto and what to be willing to let go of and how to make what is retained relevant.
Lifelong Evangelical Lutheran layman

Whoever, then, thinks that he understands the Holy Scriptures, or any part of them, but puts such an interpretation upon them as does not tend to build up this twofold love of God and our neighbour, does not yet understand them as he ought.  St. Augustine

Jay Michael

Quote from: John Mundinger on April 23, 2013, 09:46:29 PM
Quote from: Jay. on April 23, 2013, 09:32:09 PM... and you stated "I responded to a reference to repristination."  Defining "repristination" as "renewal of purity" you apparently feel the renewal of purity is bogus. 

Renewing purity is not bogus.  But, I don't think that was how that term was used in the post to which I responded and I'm not convinced that perpetuating grandfathers' churches is necessarily and exercise in renewing purity is, either.  The challenge is to know what to hold onto and what to be willing to let go of and how to make what is retained relevant.
You used the term "repristination" in your post as follows ...
Quote from: John Mundinger on April 23, 2013, 10:50:22 AM
In my opinion, the short-coming in the LCMS is that there are too many interested in a rose-colored repristination of not just LCMS history but Lutheran history.  The notion of promoting the idea that we are still worshiping in "my grandfather's church" is bogus.
... following by "The notion of promoting the idea that we are still worshiping in "my grandfather's church" is bogus."

It is incumbent on you to define YOUR use of "repristination" and then explain your concept of how "The notion of promoting the idea that we are still worshiping in "my grandfather's church" is bogus."

George Erdner

I think that those who believe that the bread and wine literally and miraculously  turned into Christ's Body and Blood only that one single time at the Last Supper, and all subsequent "remembrances" are just that, and nothing more are wrong. I think they interpret Scripture incorrectly. But I do not think they are deliberately ignoring it.

Likewise I think that those who believe that Holy Baptism is the sign of a mutual covenant between the believer and the Lord, and therefore only those old enough to understand the commitment they are making in choosing to follow Jesus are wrong. But again, I think they interpret Scripture incorrectly, but they are not deliberately ignoring Scripture.


As for ordination, the few people I've known who claim to be "fundamentalists" place a great deal of importance on ordination, even if they don't require M. Div's.

Jay Michael

Quote from: George Erdner on April 23, 2013, 11:10:05 PM
I think that those who believe that the bread and wine literally and miraculously  turned into Christ's Body and Blood only that one single time at the Last Supper, and all subsequent "remembrances" are just that, and nothing more are wrong. I think they interpret Scripture incorrectly. But I do not think they are deliberately ignoring it.

Likewise I think that those who believe that Holy Baptism is the sign of a mutual covenant between the believer and the Lord, and therefore only those old enough to understand the commitment they are making in choosing to follow Jesus are wrong. But again, I think they interpret Scripture incorrectly, but they are not deliberately ignoring Scripture.
While I agree with your thinking (with the clarification that the bread and wine NEVER miraculously changed into Christ's Body and Blood - the "in, with, and under applied in the upper room as well) our thinking is not important ... God's Holy Word is the determining factor.

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