Beliefs of Fundamentalists Christians

Started by Dave Likeness, April 21, 2013, 09:44:24 PM

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Dave Likeness

This forum seems to throw around this term with
ease.  Yet what is a Christian Fundamentalist?

Here are some basic beliefs of this movement today:

1) Inerrant Bible
2) Literal interpretation of Genesis 1 and all miracles in Bible
3) Virgin Birth and Physical Resurrection of Christ
4) Substitutionary  Atonement of Christ
5) Dispensationalism  and Pre-Millenialism


Feel free to add more to this list, this is perhaps the
basic core of their beliefs.

Jay Michael

Quote from: Dave Likeness on April 21, 2013, 09:44:24 PM
This forum seems to throw around this term with
ease.  Yet what is a Christian Fundamentalist?

Here are some basic beliefs of this movement today:

1) Inerrant Bible
2) Literal interpretation of Genesis 1 and all miracles in Bible
3) Virgin Birth and Physical Resurrection of Christ
4) Substitutionary  Atonement of Christ
5) Dispensationalism  and Pre-Millenialism


Feel free to add more to this list, this is perhaps the
basic core of their beliefs.
6) Biblical Marriage and God's order for the family
7) The Biblical account of the Flood, Jonah, and the number of fish in John 21.

George Erdner

Those Christians I've known who proudly called themselves "Fundamentalists" had some very specific beliefs. These are some of the things that they told me, to the best of my recollection. When I was hearing these things from a co-worker who was a self-styled "born-again" Christian, I didn't take careful notes in case I'd have to post them on the internet four decades later.


There is no creed except the Bible itself.
There are no denominations, just individual congregations in the Christian Church.
Every single word in the Bible is literally true in all regards.
Jesus was baptized by being immersed in the River Jordan when He was an adult. Therefore, all Christians must be baptized by full immersion when they are adults.
The Old Testament is just as true as the New Testament, including the stories of God's wrath against those who violate His Law.
God is as likely to call us to smite His enemies the way He had the Hebrews smite the people of Canaan as He is to call us to bring relief to people after disasters.
God punishes entire nations for their sins today just as He did in Bible times.
If you don't decide to choose Jesus you'll burn in hell for eternity.
Jesus died to save the people who proved they've accepted Him by following His teachings. If you don't obey His Law, then you'll be thrown out with the chaff on Judgement Day.


LutherMan

There are no  Fundamentalists in the LCMS...

J. Thomas Shelley

Here we go again...a prime example of why it was a blessed sabbath when this Forum was down....
Greek Orthodox Deacon - Ecumenical Patriarchate
Ordained to the Holy Diaconate Mary of Egypt Sunday A.D. 2022

Baptized, Confirmed, and Ordained United Methodist.
Served as a Lutheran Pastor October 31, 1989 - October 31, 2014.
Charter member of the first chapter of the Society of the Holy Trinity.

George Erdner

Quote from: Dave Likeness on April 21, 2013, 09:44:24 PM
This forum seems to throw around this term with
ease.  Yet what is a Christian Fundamentalist?

Here are some basic beliefs of this movement today:

1) Inerrant Bible
2) Literal interpretation of Genesis 1 and all miracles in Bible
3) Virgin Birth and Physical Resurrection of Christ
4) Substitutionary  Atonement of Christ
5) Dispensationalism  and Pre-Millenialism


Feel free to add more to this list, this is perhaps the
basic core of their beliefs.


You refer to "this movement" as if it were an organization with a central authority that publishes the official statements of what is and is not "Fundamentalist". What is your source for this information? Where can we find where the Official Association of Fundamentalist Christians has its headquarters? When are their official meetings? Who is their highest level leader? Are the people who claim to be "Fundamentalists" who really aren't? Do the fundamentalists have the same disputes over orthodoxy and heterodoxy as other Christian groups?

Brian Stoffregen

Quote from: George Erdner on April 22, 2013, 12:26:53 AM
Quote from: Dave Likeness on April 21, 2013, 09:44:24 PM
This forum seems to throw around this term with
ease.  Yet what is a Christian Fundamentalist?

Here are some basic beliefs of this movement today:

1) Inerrant Bible
2) Literal interpretation of Genesis 1 and all miracles in Bible
3) Virgin Birth and Physical Resurrection of Christ
4) Substitutionary  Atonement of Christ
5) Dispensationalism  and Pre-Millenialism


Feel free to add more to this list, this is perhaps the
basic core of their beliefs.


You refer to "this movement" as if it were an organization with a central authority that publishes the official statements of what is and is not "Fundamentalist". What is your source for this information? Where can we find where the Official Association of Fundamentalist Christians has its headquarters? When are their official meetings? Who is their highest level leader? Are the people who claim to be "Fundamentalists" who really aren't? Do the fundamentalists have the same disputes over orthodoxy and heterodoxy as other Christian groups?


Most of your questions will be answered by Wiki: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Christian_fundamentalism
I flunked retirement. Serving as a part-time interim in Ferndale, WA.

Charles_Austin

Since there is no "organization" or specific entity named "fundamentalism," we do not have the kind of definition derived from an organic entity. But I'd bet the cost of a good textbook that the general understanding is that fundamentalists contend that the Bible is inerrant in all ways and that Jesus Christ died for our sins ("substitutionary atonement"). Since many Baptists posit an inerrant Bible, adult baptism might be considered as a feature; but that is not a requirement.
One rarely hears references to "fundamentalists" to mean anything but these two concerns, a literal Bible, and substitutionary atonement.


Pastor Ted Crandall

Quote from: LutherMan on April 21, 2013, 11:33:35 PM
There are no  Fundamentalists in the LCMS...

Hahaha!!! 

I get it -- like, "There are no liberals in the LCMS, just confessionals and ultra-confessionals." 

Rolling on the floor! 

Seriously, when you're liberal and aren't proud of the label, just redefine everyone else to be on the far, far right and that automatically puts you back in "the sacred middle" as a more moderate confessional Lutheran  ::)

Isn't lukewarm in the middle?  See Rev. 3:16.

Compare yourselves to the founders of ALPB in 1914.  What do you suppose they would think of your new doctrine? 

Dave Likeness

As Lutherans we should not underestimate the
impact of the Fundamentalist view that Christ
will return to rule on this earth for 1000 years.
This false view pervades their beliefs and colors
their view of American foreign policy.

As strong supporters of Israel they believe that
Christ will set up his headquarters in a rebuilt
Solomon's temple in Jerusalem.

John Mundinger

Quote from: Dave Likeness on April 22, 2013, 09:13:12 AM
As strong supporters of Israel they believe that
Christ will set up his headquarters in a rebuilt
Solomon's temple in Jerusalem.

On a related note, they perceive America as the "New Israel" and with a calling to facilitate the rapture.
Lifelong Evangelical Lutheran layman

Whoever, then, thinks that he understands the Holy Scriptures, or any part of them, but puts such an interpretation upon them as does not tend to build up this twofold love of God and our neighbour, does not yet understand them as he ought.  St. Augustine

Steverem

Something our resident journalist should appreciate - a selection from the Associated Press Stylebook, page 240 (emphasis added):

Quote

Fundamentalist The word gained usage in an early 20th century fundamentalist-modernist controversy within Protestantism.  In recent years, fundamentalist has to a large extent taken on pejorative connotations except when applied to groups that stress strict, literal interpretations of Scripture and separation from other Christians.

In general, do not use fundamentalist unless a group applies the word to itself.


Sounds like a good guideline to me.

David Garner

Orthodox Reader and former Lutheran (LCMS and WELS).

John Mundinger

Quote from: Steverem on April 22, 2013, 09:20:45 AM
Something our resident journalist should appreciate - a selection from the Associated Press Stylebook, page 240 (emphasis added):

Quote

Fundamentalist The word gained usage in an early 20th century fundamentalist-modernist controversy within Protestantism.  In recent years, fundamentalist has to a large extent taken on pejorative connotations except when applied to groups that stress strict, literal interpretations of Scripture and separation from other Christians.

In general, do not use fundamentalist unless a group applies the word to itself.


Sounds like a good guideline to me.

I tend to avoid using labels because they tend to promote misunderstanding.  And, when I do use them, I try to following the guideline that you suggested.
Lifelong Evangelical Lutheran layman

Whoever, then, thinks that he understands the Holy Scriptures, or any part of them, but puts such an interpretation upon them as does not tend to build up this twofold love of God and our neighbour, does not yet understand them as he ought.  St. Augustine

Steverem

Several years ago, I wrote an article for Crisis magazine* about the use of language as a rhetorical tool by liberal church activists.  One of the points made was the way they used the term "fundamentalist."  Divorcing the term from its original, historical meaning, it was used by folks like Bob Edgar, Jim Wallis, et. al., to describe anyone that held resolutely to their religious beliefs and resisted any efforts to "modernize" the theology.  Using it as such allows for radical adherents to other religions (e.g., Wahhabi Islam) to be labeled "fundamentalists" as well.  As a result, Edgar could then say he "opposed fundamentalism in all its forms," thus tying conservative Christians to radical Islamists.  'Tis a clever, very Machiavellian maneuver. 


*Sadly (for me, at least), I don't believe the issue is available digitally.  Also sad, they chose not to use my original title for the article: "Prophetic: Just another Word for 'Nothing Left to Lose'" ("prophetic" being another one of my pet peeve terms).

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