A frivolous thread: Home Brewing

Started by PTMcCain, July 19, 2011, 09:25:19 PM

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PTMcCain

My son, Paul, just handed me the first glass of beer from his first batch: a Nutbrown Ale. Amazingly good and so fresh. I may be ruined for anything less than fresh from the home brewery.

Anyone else here home brew?

And if so, what do you brew?

Brian Stoffregen

Quote from: PTMcCain on July 19, 2011, 09:25:19 PM
My son, Paul, just handed me the first glass of beer from his first batch: a Nutbrown Ale. Amazingly good and so fresh. I may be ruined for anything less than fresh from the home brewery.

Anyone else here home brew?

And if so, what do you brew?


Fresh ground coffee in a French press.
I flunked retirement. Serving as a part-time interim in Ferndale, WA.

Charles_Austin

Trumpeting guns and booze. We got ourselves a real man here.  ::)

David Garner

#3
Guns and booze are both good, wholesome things in the right hands, as Colonel Cooper once said:

"The rifle itself has no moral stature, since it has no will of its own. Naturally, it may be used by evil men for evil purposes, but there are more good men than evil, and while the latter cannot be persuaded to the path of righteousness by propaganda, they can certainly be corrected by good men with rifles."
    —Jeff Cooper, The Art of the Rifle

As with anything, abuse does not negate the proper use.  The same, I think, is true of alcohol. 

Pastor McCain, do you (or does your son) have any advice on how to get started homebrewing?  My former Pastor is a serious homebrewer and I intend to get his counsel one day, but I am interested in any input I can get.
Orthodox Reader and former Lutheran (LCMS and WELS).

olarmy02

#4
I want to get back into it.  Haven't done it since before sem.  Hopefully by next April I'll be back brewing.  Is McCain the Younger using bottles or kegs?  5gal (approx. 19L) Coke cylinders make good home brew kegs.
Rev. S.P. McMaughan
"there is no distinction between true and false interpretation of scripture without the formation of confession"  Sasse

George Erdner

I haven't brewed anything since I moved to Georgia, but I used to make some nice stout or ale. The best thing I made wasn't beer, it was mead. We used champagne yeast, and had enough yeast and sugar left in the mix that after we bottled it, there was enough secondary ferment to make it sparkling. That was a happy accident.

Matt Staneck

I'd actually be interested in following this thread if it goes anywhere.  I want to start home brewing myself.

M. Staneck
Matt Staneck, Pastor
St. John's Evangelical Lutheran Church
Queens, NY

Coach-Rev

Quote from: Charles_Austin on July 19, 2011, 10:10:19 PM
Trumpeting guns and booze. We got ourselves a real man here.  ::)

Charles.  back off.  That is totally uncalled for.

Coach-Rev

While I've wanted to take up brewing for some time, I've settled for fermenting only.  I've got a great Riesling and Liebfraumilch, but my merlots and cabs generally aren't too good, even after 4 years in the bottle.  BUT...  the port is fantastic.  We even bottled some for use as communion wine - calling it "Luther's Passion" lol

PTMcCain

My son researched it a bit on the Internet, bought the materials he needed, followed the instructions and voila, great beer. I know the key is fastidiousness with keeping everything very clean. So far, so good.

TravisW

A buddy of mine and I have made a fair number of batches, but nothing for about a year now.  We typically brew closer to winter, when temperature is a bit more steady.  The best we've done so far is a Bass-type ale that came out remarkably clear and tasty. 

Now, if you're looking at just starting out, I'd recommend starting with a kit brew.  Basically, you choose your style of beer, and the kit consists of malt syrup (generally pre-hopped) and a yeast packet.  You provide the water, etc...

There are some non-essential but terribly useful bits of equipment that you can use.  A large propane turkey fryer becomes a fantastic outdoor boiler.  A wort cooling coil helps tons in getting the wort from boiling to pitching temp quickly (less time for molds and whatnot to populate the wort).  We found that brewing outside eliminates some of the contamination issues that you find in the average kitchen. 

The biggest factors in getting a decent beer brewed (aside from having a good recipe) are sanitation and ingredient quality--primarily water.  Beer generally only has about 4 ingredients (water, malt, hops, yeast), and water is the biggest component.  Good water = good beer.  Bad water = bad beer. 

CSLewis2

Okay Paul, but I think your son needs to take his brewing skills to the next level and start making wine for the Holy Communion. That is a real challenge to get things just right. Tried it myself and only got one bottle worth using.

Peace in the Lord Jesus Christ!
Rob Buechler

iowakatie1981

Quote from: Charles_Austin on July 19, 2011, 10:10:19 PM
Trumpeting guns and booze. We got ourselves a real man here.  ::)

Just call me a "bitter clinger", although I'm not a man. 

(But there are plenty of feminists that are embarrassed I have the same body parts as them...)

Sigh...life goes on...

Evangel

I got into home brewing (from extract kits, not from grains) a few years ago (though I haven't brewed lately).  The kit I picked up to get started is the Better Basic Starter Kit from Northern Brewer.  A far better kit than the "Mr. Beer" kits you see in places like Bed Bath and Beyond around Christmas time.
Mark Schimmel, Pastor
Zion Lutheran Church, LCMC
Priddy, TX
--
ACXXIII, "Your majesty will graciously take into account the fact that, in these last times of which the Scriptures prophesy, the world is growing worse and men are becoming weaker and more infirm."

JoeEckman

I've been brewing for about 15 years.  My best was a double bock lager.  I also make mead and wine.  I think the two most important keys to beer brewing is to keep things clean and to use a yeast starter.  A yeast starter is nothing more than a small batch of beer (8 to 24 ounces) made about 24 to 36 hours before it is needed for the larger batch.  The type of yeast is also important and varies with the stale of the beer.

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